Last edited by Kagar
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

1 edition of 1979 Douglas-fir tussock moth suppression projects found in the catalog.

1979 Douglas-fir tussock moth suppression projects

1979 Douglas-fir tussock moth suppression projects

Santa Fe National Forest and Ellena Gallegos Grant

  • 43 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Forest Insect and Disease Management, State and Private Forestry, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service in Albuquerque, N.M .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth -- Control -- New Mexico -- Santa Fe National Forest.,
  • Douglas-fir tussock moth -- Control -- New Mexico -- Ellena Gallegos Grant.,
  • Santa Fe National Forest (N.M.),
  • Ellena Gallegos Grant (N.M.)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Thomas H. Hofacker ... [et al.].
    SeriesR-3 ; 80-2
    ContributionsHofacker, Thomas H., United States. Forest Service. Southwestern Region. Forest Insect and Disease Management.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationii, 23 p. :
    Number of Pages23
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15392760M

    The Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata, (McDunnough) is a native insect species in the Western USA and Canada whose larvae feed on the needles of Douglas-fir, true firs and spruce. Mature tussock moth caterpillars are about 25 to 30 mm (1 to inches) long and striking looking with brightly colored tufts of hair. See Figure 2. The. Adult Douglas-fir tussock moth male. He is a dull, brown-gray, ordinary looking moth. Table 1. Total Volume Decline l of Tree Mortality with [no treatment) Natural Degree of defoliation Estimate Class 1, Intensive Class II, Moderate Class III, Light Class IV, None OSU low1 Percent 84 84 Percent 16 19 34 Percent 0 Percent 0.

    Fig. 1. Artificial pupation shelters used for monitoring Douglas-fir tussock moth cocoons and egg masses in California, and Refer to text for more information regarding shelter design. Modified Figure 1 reprinted with permission from the authors, granted Ap   The Douglas-fir tussock moth model and its linkage to PROGNOSIS provided the initial paradigm for CANUSA-West's modeling efforts (Chap Brookes et al. , Colbert et al. ).

    Objectives: To develop a method of assessing tussock moth egg mass density rapidly within non-defoliated stands; and to predict if significant damage will occur the following year. Abstract: The Douglas-fir tussock moth is a major defoliator of Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, and true firs, Abies spp., in western North America. Detecting suboutbreak populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth by sequential sampling of early larvae in the lower tree crown. USDA Forest Service Research Paper PNW 9 pages. - New Window; Mason, R.R. How to sample larvae of the Douglas-fir tussock moth. USDA Agriculture Handbook 15 pages. - New Window; Mason, R. R.; Overton.


Share this book
You might also like
Zoric the spaceman

Zoric the spaceman

Doors open day

Doors open day

Changing perceptions

Changing perceptions

DRB Aviation Medical Research Unit reports

DRB Aviation Medical Research Unit reports

Prenatal and infancy home visitation by nurses

Prenatal and infancy home visitation by nurses

computer from Pascal to von Neumann

computer from Pascal to von Neumann

Eighth European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Prague, Czechoslovakia, 19-23 September 1977.

Eighth European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics, Prague, Czechoslovakia, 19-23 September 1977.

Governor in the Indian constitution

Governor in the Indian constitution

A northern light; or A new index to the Bible

A northern light; or A new index to the Bible

private life of the Romans

private life of the Romans

General management plan

General management plan

1979 Douglas-fir tussock moth suppression projects Download PDF EPUB FB2

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Orgyia pseudotsugata Key Wildlife Value: The Douglas-fir tussock moth creates snags and down wood by severely defoliating and causing the death of all sizes of true fir and Douglas-fir trees.

It also interacts with other disturbance agents, especially bark beetles, to. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK Evaluation of sticking agents mixed with Bacillus thuringiensis for control of Douglas-fir tussock moth Item Preview remove-circle Topics Douglas-fir tussock moth Control United.

The following is excerpted from the Methow Valley Ranger District Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Suppression Project, Final Report of Followup Monitoring: "The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a major defoliator of Douglas-fir and true firs.

The following is excerpted from the Methow Valley Ranger District Douglas-fir Tussock Moth Suppression Project, Final Report of Followup Monitoring: "The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is a major defoliator of Douglas-fir and true firs.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth in the northern region--a cartographic history of outbreaks from to USDA Forest Serv, Div Sate and Priv For, North Reg, Missoula. The Forest Entomologist with the Thompson Okanagan Region, Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO) states we are experiencing the start of a Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreak throughout the region.

She checked out our area a week ago and found evidence of the natural virus in the population. If private land owners want. Movement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into new locations around the state sometimes result from humans incidentally moving construction materials or other items that have attached egg masses.

Life History and Habits Douglas-fir tussock moth spends the winter as an egg within the egg mass. Eggs hatch in the spring, often in late May. Get this from a library. Douglas-fir tussock moth handbook: predation and parasitization of Douglas-fir tussock moth egg masses.

[Torolf R Torgersen; Richard. Get this from a library. Douglas-fir tussock moth handbook: how to sample Douglas-fir tussock moth larvae. [Richard R Mason; United States. Department of Agriculture.]. Get this from a library. Douglas-fir tussock moth: an annotated bibliography. [Robert W Campbell; Lorna C Youngs; Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Portland, Or.)] -- "This annotated bibliography includes references to papers.

Each deals in some way with either the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), or a related species. The Douglas-fir tussock moth is one of the most destructive forest defoliators in western North America.

Densities of most tussock-moth populations fluctuate over time with considerable regularity. Fluctuations in density on warm, dry sites where populations have a high intrinsic rate of increase are more likely to periodically reach outbreak.

Keywords: Western spruce budworm, Douglas-fir tussock moth, tree rings, Blue Mountains, forest health, dendroecology. Tree-ring samples from 21 mixed-conifer stands in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon were analyzed for evidence of past western spruce budworm and Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks.

Hosts: Douglas-fir, white fir and spruce Figure 8. Adult male (left) and femail (right) Douglas-fir moth. Symptoms/Signs: The caterpillar of the Douglas-fir tussock moth is grayish with brightly colored tufts of hair and a shiny black are also two long horns of black hairs behind the head and another at the rear of the body.

The Lymantriinae (formerly called the Lymantriidae) are a subfamily of moths of the family taxon was erected by George Hampson in Many of its component species are referred to as "tussock moths" of one sort or another. The caterpillar, or larval, stage of these species often has a distinctive appearance of alternating bristles and haired projections.

Get this from a library. Douglas-fir tussock moth handbook: how to determine the occurrence of virus in egg masses. [Milton J Stelzer; United States. Department of Agriculture.]. Douglas-fircan cause problems because the larval hairs tussockMovement of Douglas-fir tussock moth into moth during outbreaks.

©Colorado State University Extension. 3/ Revised 7/ Caterpillars of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough), chew the needles of spruces, Douglas fir and true firs.

Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough) defoliation was detected by aerial survey on three areas of the Wasatch-Cache National Forest in and Outbreaks occur in cycles around eight to twelve years and usually last up to four years, sometimes longer.

Reports from Idaho and Washington indicate had a major outbreak. The larvae feed on Pseudotsuga and Abies species, especially Douglas fir, grand fir, white fir, and subalpine fir. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

National Emergency Library. Top American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Open Library. Featured movies All video latest This Just In. The sex pheromone of the Douglass-fir tussock moth Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunnough) has been isolated and identified as (Z)heneicosenone.

This compound and its E isomer have been synthesized and are highly potent in laboratory bioassays and field trials.Tussock Moth Control Tussock moth control is an important component of any property owner in urban Colorado.

The Douglas Fir tussock moth is a common pest in Colorado. The Tussock moth caterpillar (Orgyia psuedotsugata) eat the needles of spruce, Douglas fir, and true fir trees.

These caterpillars cause defoliation, which occurs rapidly from. Tussock Moth caterpillars (from the family Lymantriidae) are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests.

The best-known member of this family is the beautiful but highly detrimental Gypsy Moth which is not native to North America. After its introduction, the potential for destruction these critters could wreak became all too clear.